Calligraphy as a Spiritual Experience Beyond the Script

Authors

  • Shumaila Islam Lecturer (Visiting) Institute of Art & Design, Sargodha University, Sargodha & University of Education, Lahore Pakistan
  • Hassan Babar Lecturer Fine Arts, University of Sargodha, Sargodha/ Doctoral Candidate, College of Art & design, Punjab University, Lahore
  • Huma sajjad Lecturer (Visiting) Institute of Art & Design, Sargodha University, Sargodha

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.53762/alqamar.05.01.e07

Keywords:

Calligraphy; Calligram; Transformation; Spiritual; Mystical; Reflection; Sensory; Kinesthetic

Abstract

Calligraphy is a beautiful and expressive form of language for conveying tangible and intangible messages in various scripts. Other than its perceptible form and communicational message, it has the potential to be unveiled in various contexts such as the glorification of sacred language for valuing its status as an esthetic form or a mystic experience attaining spirituality through repetition of verbal invocation, and meditative marks. Applying a descriptive research method, this study will be explaining a brief history of the emergence of calligraphy in South Asia and its functional usage. Furthermore, the practice lead essay shall unveil the journey of learning traditional calligraphy into thematic commercial, lastly its transformation into an intellectual and spiritual experience and its concealed meanings and impacts on researcher. The descriptive visual essay presents an interesting practice-led experiential disclosure and reflection of its transformations for the lover of calligraphy and textual art through sensory and kinesthetic experience.

 

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Published

2022-03-31

How to Cite

Shumaila Islam, Hassan Babar, and Huma sajjad. 2022. “Calligraphy As a Spiritual Experience Beyond the Script”. Al-Qamar 5 (1):125-52. https://doi.org/10.53762/alqamar.05.01.e07.